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Easy Keto Miso Soup Recipe (Gluten Free, Low Carb)

When you think about comfort foods in Japanese cuisine, miso soup undoubtedly comes to mind. Yet, for those following a ketogenic diet or simply looking to cut back on carbs, the traditional recipe might be off the table. But not anymore! Sip on a delectable, low-carb version of this beloved Keto Miso Soup that’s not only easy to whip up but also brimming with health benefits.

Two gray bowls of keto miso soup on a table with a white cloth and spoons.

❀️ Why You Will Love This Recipe

Quick and Simple

Making this keto miso soup is a breeze. Whether you’ve just returned from a busy day at work or you’re entertaining guests at a dinner party, this dish will be ready in a jiffy. Plus, it only requires a few ingredients, most of which can be found at your local grocery store or in the Asian aisle of western countries’ supermarkets.

Nutrient-Dense

Miso soup, by its very nature, is a powerhouse of nutrients. With ingredients like miso paste, tofu, and green onions, you’re getting a dose of essential amino acids, vitamin K, probiotic food benefits, and so much more. Moreover, since it’s a keto-friendly soup option (4g net carbs per serving!), you’ll be feeding your body good fats without the high carbohydrate content.

Authentic Japanese Taste with a Twist

While we’ve modified the traditional Japanese soup to fit a low-carb diet, we haven’t compromised on taste. Thanks to ingredients like sesame oil, miso, and bok choy, this soup offers the unique umami flavor loved by many. And with the addition of tofu, you also get that essential protein that’s perfect for keto dieters.

Perfect for Boosting Immunity

Miso soup is not only delicious but also boasts properties beneficial for the immune system. Given the world’s current health climate, anything that can give your immunity a boost is a welcome addition to your diet. Plus, the addition of garlic, a natural immunity enhancer, in our recipe further fortifies this bowl of soup.

πŸ—οΈ Key Ingredients & Substitutions

Sesame Oil: Provides a distinct and authentic Asian flavor to the soup. If you don’t have sesame oil on hand, you can opt for a neutral oil, although it might slightly change the taste profile.

Onion and Garlic: These ingredients add depth to the flavor. If you’re looking for a low-carb option, you could minimize the onion or use green onions/scallions instead.

Bok Choy: Also known as pak choy, this leafy green not only gives the soup a nice texture but also adds a wealth of vitamins. Feel free to substitute with spinach or another favorite veggie.

Vegetable Broth: Serves as the base of the soup. If you can find dashi stock, that is ideal for this easy recipe. On the other hand, chicken broth can be used for a non-vegetarian variant.

Miso: This fermented paste is the star ingredient, offering a salty depth and a ton of health benefits. There are different types of miso like white, yellow, and red. For this recipe, any type can work based on your personal preference.

Firm Tofu: Adds protein to the soup. If tofu isn’t your thing, you might consider adding thinly sliced chicken or shrimp.

Lemon: A squeeze of fresh lemon juice at the end brightens up the soup. Apple cider vinegar can be a substitute if you’re in a pinch.

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πŸ₯£ How to Make Keto Miso Soup

Getting Started

Begin by heating the sesame oil in a medium pot on the stove over medium heat. This forms the base for our aromatic concoction.

Adding sesame oil to a pot with a tablespoon.

Sauteing the Veggies

Once the oil is hot, sauté the onions until they begin to soften, which usually takes about 2 minutes. Next, toss in the garlic and pak choy and sauté for an additional minute. This process enriches the soup with flavors from the veggies.

Building the Broth

Now, pour in the vegetable broth and allow it to come to a simmer. Once simmering, add in the miso paste. Stirring continuously ensures the miso dissolves completely, avoiding any lumps.

Finishing Touches

As the broth simmers, it’s time to prepare the tofu. Press the tofu block with a paper towel to eliminate excess moisture, then slice it into small cubes. Add the tofu to the soup, allowing it to heat thoroughly.

For that final touch, give the soup a squeeze of fresh lemon juice, stir, and serve.

Squeezing fresh lemon juice into miso soup.

Toss on some sliced green onions if desired. Enjoy your comforting, keto-friendly bowl of miso soup!

Two gray bowls of keto miso soup on a table with a white cloth and a spoon taking a bite of soup out of the bowl.

πŸ«™ Storage Instructions

Cool Before Storing

Before packing away any leftovers, ensure the soup has cooled down to room temperature. This helps in preserving the flavor and nutritional value.

Refrigeration

Pour your keto miso soup into an airtight container and pop it into the refrigerator. It should keep well for up to 3-4 days. When you’re ready to reheat, a gentle simmer on the stove should do the trick – remember not to boil to preserve those probiotics!

Freezing Isn’t Ideal

While you can freeze the soup, it’s worth noting that the texture of tofu might change upon thawing, becoming a bit more porous and spongy. If that doesn’t bother you, go ahead and store it in the freezer. When ready to eat, let it thaw in the fridge overnight and warm it up on the stove.

πŸͺ„ Recipe Notes & Tips

Choosing the Right Miso Paste

While miso comes in various types – white, red, and yellow – each one brings its unique flavor. White miso, for instance, offers a milder, slightly sweeter taste ideal for light broths, while red miso is bolder and saltier, perfect for robust soups. It’s all about personal preference, so experiment and find the one that tickles your taste buds! See below for more info on different types of miso.

To Tofu or Not to Tofu?

If you’re new to tofu, remember: the key to great tofu is pressing it properly to remove excess water. This ensures a better texture and allows the tofu to absorb the soup’s flavors more effectively. If tofu isn’t quite your thing, remember our earlier tip about substituting with chicken or shrimp.

Keeping the Nutrients Intact

Miso is a fermented food, rich in probiotics and enzymes. To preserve its nutritional profile, avoid bringing the soup to boiling point after adding the miso paste. High temperatures can destroy the beneficial bacteria and enzymes present in the miso. A gentle simmer is all you need!

Taste As You Go

Everyone’s taste preference is different. While the recipe provides a guideline, don’t be shy about adjusting the ingredients to your liking. Maybe a splash more of sesame oil or an extra dash of lemon juice?

Overhead photo of two gray bowls of keto miso soup on a table with a white cloth and spoons.

🍽️ What can I serve with Keto Miso Soup?

Keto-Friendly Sides

To complete your meal, consider serving the soup with a side of keto-friendly dishes. Sesame Broccoli or Spicy Zucchini Noodles complement the soup well, and why not have some crunchy sauerkraut as well for texture? A refreshing cucumber or cabbage salad with a sprinkle of sesame seeds and a drizzle of tamari sauce (a gluten-free alternative to soy sauce) can also be delightful. 

Low-Carb Protein Boost

Looking for additional protein? A serving of grilled chicken, beef, or fish marinated in tamari sauce, ginger, and a hint of sesame oil pairs wonderfully with the subtle flavors of the miso soup.

Crunchy Veggie Sticks

For a crunchy contrast, serve your soup with some raw veggie sticks like bell peppers, celery, or cucumber. Not only are they low in carbs, but they also bring a delightful textural difference to your meal.

A Toasted Treat

For those occasional indulgences, how about a slice of keto bread toasted with a touch of garlic butter? Trust me, dunking that into your miso soup is a bite of heaven!

πŸ€” Which Type Of Miso Is Keto?

This thick paste comes in a few different varieties, each made from fermented soybeans mixed with various grains. But when it comes to keto, the carbohydrate content of these grains is where things get interesting.

White Miso (Shiro Miso)

White miso is usually made from a higher percentage of rice along with soybeans. It has a sweet, mild flavor. In terms of carbs, white miso does contain some, but typically in small amounts. A tablespoon might have around 4-6 grams of carbs. For those on a strict keto diet, you might want to use it sparingly or check the nutrition label to ensure it fits within your daily carb limit.

Red Miso (Aka Miso)

Red miso is fermented longer than white miso and often contains barley or other grains along with soybeans. Its taste is strong and salty. Because of the longer fermentation and possible addition of barley, red miso might contain a similar or slightly higher carb count than white miso. Again, portion control and checking the nutritional info is key.

Yellow Miso (Shinshu Miso)

Yellow miso strikes a balance between white and red. It’s usually made with soybeans and barley or another grain. Carb-wise, yellow miso falls in the same ballpark as white and red.

So, Which One is Best for Keto?

Strictly speaking, all types of miso have some carbs due to the grains used in fermentation. If you’re aiming to keep your carb intake to a minimum, you’ll want to use miso in moderation and always measure out your portions. Remember, a little goes a long way in terms of flavor!

That being said, the amount of miso typically used in recipes is relatively small, so even if you add a tablespoon or two to your soup or marinade, you’re unlikely to break your carb bank. The key? As with many things on keto (and in life!), moderation is your friend.

🍲 Is Miso Soup Keto?

Homemade miso soup can easily be made keto, however, miso soup from a Japanese restaurant may contain hidden carbs. It’s best to avoid it if you’re being strict. For more information, be sure to check out our post: Is Miso Soup Keto?

Two gray bowls of keto miso soup on a table with a white cloth.

❓ Frequently Asked Questions

Can I make this soup vegan?

The recipe is already a plant-based vegan miso soup. Just ensure your vegetable broth is vegan (some might contain animal derivatives).

How can I reduce the sodium content?

Opt for a reduced-sodium miso paste and broth. You can also dilute the broth a bit more and enhance flavors with herbs and spices.

Is this miso soup gluten-free?

Traditional miso paste is fermented with a fungus called a. oryzae and should be gluten-free. However, always check labels as some might have added ingredients that contain gluten.

Can I add other veggies to the soup?

Of course! Feel free to toss in veggies like shiitake mushrooms, wakame seaweed, or spinach for added nutrition and texture.

Close up of miso soup.

πŸ˜‹ More Keto Recipes You Will Love

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πŸ“– Recipe

Two gray bowls of keto miso soup on a table with a white cloth and spoons.

Keto Miso Soup Recipe

Bethany Galloway
Sip on a delectable, low-carb version of this beloved Keto Miso Soup that's not only easy to whip up but also brimming with health benefits.
5 from 1 vote
Prep Time 5 minutes
Cook Time 20 minutes
Total Time 25 minutes
Course Soups & Stews
Cuisine Japanese
Servings 4 Servings
Calories 171 kcal

Ingredients
  

  • 2 tablespoons sesame oil
  • 1/2 onion diced
  • 3 garlic cloves minced
  • 2 heads of bok choy shredded
  • 10 cups vegetable broth or daishi stock
  • 2 tablespoons white miso paste
  • 1 block firm tofu
  • squeeze of fresh lemon juice
  • Green onions sliced, to garnish (optional)

Instructions
 

  • Heat the sesame oil in a medium pot on the stove over medium heat.
    Adding sesame oil to a pot with a tablespoon.
  • Sautee onions for 2 minutes until they begin to soften.
    Sautéing onions in a stainless steel pot.
  • Add garlic and bok choy, and sautee for one minute.
    Sautéing onions, garlic, and bok choy in a stainless steel pot.
  • Add vegetable broth and bring to a simmer.
    Pouring vegetable broth into miso soup.
  • Add in miso and stir until dissolved.
    Adding miso paste to miso soup.
  • Simmer for 10 minutes.
  • Meanwhile, press the block of tofu with paper towel to remove excess moisture and slice into small cubes.
    Pressing a tofu block with a paper towel.
  • Add tofu to the soup and stir until heated through.
    Adding cubed tofu to miso soup.
  • Add a squeeze (or two!) of fresh lemon juice.
  • Garnish with sliced green onions if desired, serve and enjoiy!
    Two gray bowls of keto miso soup on a table with a white cloth and spoons.

Notes

  1. Miso Paste: While miso comes in various types – white, red, and yellow – each one brings its unique flavor. White miso, for instance, offers a milder, slightly sweeter taste ideal for light broths, while red miso is bolder and saltier, perfect for robust soups. It’s all about personal preference, so experiment and find the one that tickles your taste buds!
  2. Tofu: If you’re new to tofu, remember: the key to great tofu is pressing it properly to remove excess water. This ensures a better texture and allows the tofu to absorb the soup’s flavors more effectively.
  3. Other protein: If tofu isn’t quite your thing, remember our earlier tip about substituting with chicken or shrimp.
  4. Add more veggies: Feel free to toss in veggies like shiitake mushrooms, wakame seaweed, or spinach for added nutrition and texture. 
  5. Don’t Boil: Miso is a fermented food, rich in probiotics and enzymes. To preserve its nutritional profile, avoid bringing the soup to boiling point after adding the miso paste. High temperatures can destroy the beneficial bacteria and enzymes present in the miso. A gentle simmer is all you need!
  6. Taste As You Go: Everyone’s taste preference is different. While the recipe provides a guideline, don’t be shy about adjusting the ingredients to your liking. Maybe a splash more of sesame oil or an extra dash of lemon juice?
  7. Storage: Pour your keto miso soup into an airtight container and pop it into the refrigerator. It should keep well for up to 3-4 days. When you’re ready to reheat, a gentle simmer on the stove should do the trick – remember not to boil to preserve those probiotics!
  8. Freezing: While you can freeze the soup, it’s worth noting that the texture of tofu might change upon thawing, becoming a bit more porous and spongy. If that doesn’t bother you, go ahead and store it in the freezer. When ready to eat, let it thaw in the fridge overnight and warm it up on the stove.

Nutrition

Serving: 1gCalories: 171kcalCarbohydrates: 6gProtein: 10gFat: 12gSaturated Fat: 2gPolyunsaturated Fat: 6gMonounsaturated Fat: 4gSodium: 322mgPotassium: 48mgFiber: 2gSugar: 1gVitamin A: 30IUVitamin C: 2mgCalcium: 136mgIron: 1mg
Keyword easy, fall, keto miso soup, quick, weight loss smoothie, winter
Tried this recipe?Let us know how it was!

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